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Bolivia - Life of a Digital Nomad | Work - Travel - Repeat

Bolivia

Bolivia

Etymology

South American republic, founded 1825, named for Simon Bolivar (1783-1830), statesman and soldier. [online etymology dictionary]

Places to Meet People

Places to Meet People

Bitcoin Bolivia – All lovers of technology of innovation and everything related to learning, each and every one who feels capable and with the curiosity to know that you must learn more of this new technology, from Bolivia to the world. [meetup]

Bolivia Laravel Meetup – This is a group inspired to discover everything related to Laravel and other technology stacks used to implement applications (back and front end) web. As well as, the domain and correct use of concepts and paradigms the software development cycle. [meetup]

Hacks/Hackers La Paz – The world of hackers and journalists come together as information becomes digital and Internet companies become media empires. Journalists call themselves “hacks,” someone who can “cut” words in any situation. Hackers use programming codes to process available materials. This meeting space between hackers and journalists tries to unite the two worlds. [meetup]

La Paz BlockChain Meetup – There is a whole lot of hype around Blockchain. But how does it work? What is a smart contract? Why is everyone so excited about DAOs? And what does all of this have to do with cryptocurrencies? [meetup]

How to Find a Date

How to Find a Date

Badoo – A massive worldwide online dating site launched in 2006, Badoo is an OK option for Bolivia. On face value, if you do a search of let’s say, women between 25 and 35 years old, you will turn up a lot of women in your search results. The problem with Badoo though is that you will have to weed through a lot of trash in order to find real profiles or real people. The quality is just not as good as you will find on Latin American Cupid although the selection is a lot larger. Because of my issues with the quality of profiles on Badoo, I would not focus on it as a starting point for my dating search. [visa hunter]

Latin American Cupid – Latin American Cupid is OK for Bolivia. It is not great because the selection is so limited. Nevertheless, it has the best in terms of quality compared to any other dating site in the country. There seem to be a lot of men and women on the site clustered in Santa Cruz, so, if you are going to use this site, Santa Cruz seems like your best city for attaining success. [visa hunter]

Walking Tours

Walking Tours

Free Walking Tour- Santa Cruz Bolivia – Enjoy 2 hours walking tour and discovering the alternative side of santa cruz, its sights, historical monuments and typical and a Traditionalists place where you can find souvenirs specially typical from santa cruz. [facebook]

Kanoo Tours – Get to know Bolivia’s largest cities with one of our unique city tours – all of our city tours are in small groups so that you can fully interact with the guide. We have a few options for La Paz city tours, from the standard walking tour in the city centre to more extended tours that include the neighbouring city of El Alto and the Southern Zone of the city. [kanoo tours]

La Paz Walking Tour – In La Paz Walking Tours we are the local leaders in showing the city with our years of expertise and help of our local professional guides. We have excellent reviews in Tripadvisor, including a Certificate of Excellence. We ensure to deliver an off the beaten track tour, showing the authentic aspects of the Bolivian daily life, as well as the main highlights of the city of La Paz. Everything with the highest quality and the most interesting information you could expect from a city tour. [la paz walking tours]

Red Cap Walking Tours – Red C&P offers the best of what’s happening in La Paz, Bolivia!  We love to share our culture and city with everyone that comes to this amazing city! [red cap walking tours]

Free Things to Do

Free Things to Do

Cerro Rico, Potosi – The “rich mountain” or “Cerro Rico” that towers over the city of Potosí once held the silver that lured Spanish Conquistadors to the world’s highest city. Cerro Rico is the ideal travel destination for those who want to explore the affect that colonization had upon the indigenous people of Bolivia. Although the silver is long gone, tin is still mined from Cerro Rico. [touropia]

Jesuit Missions of Chiquitos – This region consists of six mission towns founded by a handful of Jesuit priests in the 17th and 18th centuries. While Jesuit Missions in Paraguay and Argentina have since fallen into disrepair, their Bolivian counterparts remain a vibrant cultural force, set against a frontier-town backdrop straight out of the 1986 Robert de Niro film, “The Mission”. These towns can be visited in one long tour, or there is lodging available in all of them. [touropia]

Lake Titicaca – Bordering Bolivia and Peru, Lake Titicaca is the largest lake in South America. Incans, as well as a number of other native peoples, are thought to have originated in the region. Near the south-eastern shore of the lake lies Tiwanaku, ruins of an ancient city state that scholars believe was a precursor of the Inca Empire. Lake Titicaca is a popular vacation destination. The original Copacabana is a favorite resort for both tourists and locals. [touropia]

Madidi National Park – Madidi National Park stretches from the Andes to the Amazon. Encompassing over 7,000 square miles, Madidi is known as one the most biologically diverse parks in the world. Visitors to Madidi may spot an elusive jaguar, a giant otter or the titi monkey, a species of monkey found nowhere else in the world. More than 11 percent of the planet’s 9,000 species of birds can be found in Madidi National Park. [touropia]

Oruro Carnival – Each year in Oruro, just before Ash Wednesday, the city of Oruro hosts the Carnaval de Oruro, one of the most important folkloric and cultural events in all of South America. The festival features over 28,000 dancers, performing a broad variety of ethnic dances. Around 10,000 musicians accompany the dancers. Unlike carnival in Rio where a new theme is chosen each year, carnival in Oruro always begins with the diablada or devil dance. [touropia]

Reserva Eduardo Avaroa – The Eduardo Avaroa Andean Fauna National Reserve in the harsh Southwest Circuit region of Bolivia was created to protect the endangered vicuna and the llareta plant. The reserve is also home to some of the planet’s most unusual landscapes. Bright white salt flats and the rainbow-colored mineral lakes of Los Lipez are both much too harsh to support human life but are a refuge for many rare and endangered South American species including several large colonies of flamingo. [touropia]

Salar de Uyuni – For a truly out-of-this-world travel destination, it’s hard to match the Salar de Uyuni. One of the flattest places in the world, the 4,000-square-mile salt flats were formed by a prehistoric lake. Visitors travel in 4×4 vehicles across the expanse of the salt flats to visit locally fashioned structures made entirely from bricks of salt. The salt flats are at their most spectacular after a rain, when water sitting atop the cemented salt acts like a mirror, perfectly reflecting the sky above. [touropia]

Sucre – Known as the “City of Four Names”, Sucre is also called Charcas, La Plata and Chuquisaca. Founded in the 1500s by Spanish colonials, Sucre offers visitors a clear glimpse of life in aristocratic Spain in the 16th century. Sucre has many important historical buildings worth visiting, including La Casa de la Libertad, where Simón Bolívar wrote the Bolivian Constitution, and Bolivia’s National Library, which features documents dating to the 15th century. [touropia]

Tiwanaku – Located near the south-eastern shore of Lake Titicaca in Bolivia, Tiwanaku is one of the most important precursors to the Inca Empire. The community grew to urban proportions between the 7th and 9th centuries, becoming an important regional power in the southern Andes. [touropia]

Yungas Road – Dubbed the “World’s Most Dangerous Road” Yungas Road runs from La Paz to Bolivia’s Amazon rainforest region in the north of the country. From La Paz, the road climbs around 15,000 feet before descending around 4,000 feet to the town of Coroico. The road has proved dangerous for those traveling in vehicles, but Yungas has become a favorite travel attraction for mountain bikers who rave about the 40-mile-long stretch of downhill riding. [touropia]

Festivals

Festivals

Equinox of Winter – The date of this ancient celebration marks the first rays of sun during the winter solstice each year. A gathering of indigenous leaders from the Aymara population come together in Tihuanaco (La Paz) to pay homage to the new year. Mass and pagan rituals celebrate the power of the fertility and good luck god Inti. Crops are offered as gifts to the deity for the coming harvest. [iexplore]

Exaltacion de la Santa Cruz – This religious festival for the holy cross takes place September 14 in Sorata (La Paz), Potosi, Oruro, and Cochabamba. It is one of the biggest events in Cochabamba and Sorata’s most important day. A pilgrim procession in veneration of el Senor de Manquiri takes place in Potosi along with dancing, music, and mass. [iexplore]

Fiesta de la Cruz – This festival revering the cross on which Christ was crucified takes place on May 3 in Bolivia nationwide. The best parties are held on the island of Suriqui (Lake Titicaca) and in Tarija, Vallegrande (Santa Cruz), Copacabana (La Paz), and Cochabamba. [iexplore]

Navidad – Observed December 24 nationwide, this is the holiest of all festivals on the Christian calendar, better known to westerners as Christmas. Each area in Bolivia has its own variation, but the more exotic ones are in Villa Serrano and Sucre (Chuquisaca), Vallegrande (Santa Cruz), San Ignacio de Moxos (Beni), and Tarija, where some of the celebrations last until the end of January. [iexplore]

Oruro – A sleepy mining town, centuries of tradition and a fusion of Catholic and indigenous religious beliefs come together to form Bolivia’s most popular festival. Oruro is celebrated the week before Ash Wednesday and in just a few days’ time, the town sees more than 400,000 visitors. People come from all over to witness the marching bands, the traditional folk dances and parades that are so elaborate they last for dozens of hours. [iexplore]

San Francisco Xavier – This is the main festival of the city of San Francisco Xavier. Typical dances of the aboriginal inhabitants are a spectacle and represent the actual defenses that the Jesuit Missionaries acted out against the Portuguese. This event takes place December 3 in Santa Cruz. [iexplore]

San Juan – A celebration for San Juan Batista is held across Bolivia on June 24. Large bonfires are ignited and people drink and jump across the flames. In the highlands, they light fires to keep evil spirits away on the coldest day of the year. [iexplore]

San Lorenzo – This celebration is held in the neighborhood of San Lorenzo, in the city of Santa Cruz, as well as in the town of San Lorenzo in Tarija. Dancing, music, and colorful processions reign on this August 10 event in Bolivia. [iexplore]

Semana Santa – Starting April 13, Holy Week celebrations occur throughout Bolivia. The best festivities are held in Copacabana where hundreds of pilgrims arrive on foot from La Paz on Good Friday. Interesting variations take place in Oruro, Tarija, Yotala, Potosi, and Santa Cruz. [iexplore]

Todos Santos – A religious celebration of All Saints’ Day on November 1-2, cemeteries and graves throughout Bolivia are visited by relatives and loved ones. Flowers and garlands are placed on the tombstones and tables are set with a place for the spirit of the deceased. There is a tradition to bake bread babies, sweets, and various refreshments throughout the festival. [iexplore]

Virgen del Rosario – Held during the first week of October in Viacha (La Paz), Quillacollo, Tarata and Morochata (Cochabamba), Tarija (Tarija), Warnes (Santa Cruz), Tarabuco (Chuquisaca), Huayllas (Oruro), and other places across Bolivia, this celebration for the Virgin of the Rosary includes mass, processions, music, fireworks, and dancing. [iexplore]

Public Transit

Public Transit

Camión – Prior to today’s expansive bus network, camiónes (trucks) were often the only way for travelers to venture off the beaten track. These days, in the more populated areas you might consider a camión trip more for the novelty value than necessity; it is how many campesinos (subsistence farmers) choose to travel. [lonely planet]

Hitchhiking – Thanks to relatively easy access to camiones and a profusion of buses, hitchhiking isn’t really necessary or popular in Bolivia. Still, it’s not unknown and drivers of movilidades – coches (cars), camionetas (pickup trucks), NGO vehicles, gas trucks and other vehicles – are usually happy to pick up passengers when they have room. Always ask the price, if any, before climbing aboard, even for short distances. If they do charge, it should amount to about half the bus fare for the same distance. [lonely planet]

Micros, Minibuses & Trufis – Micros (half-size buses) are used in larger cities and are Bolivia’s least expensive form of public transport. They follow set routes, with the route numbers or letters usually marked on a placard behind the windshield. There is also often a description of the route, including the streets taken to reach the end of the line. They can be hailed anywhere along their route, though bus stops are starting to pop up in some bigger cities. When you want to disembark, move toward the front and tell the driver or assistant where you want them to stop. [lonely planet]

Taxis – In cities and towns, taxis are relatively inexpensive. Few are equipped with meters, but in most places there are standard per-person fares for short hauls. In some places, taxis are collective and behave more like trufis, charging a set rate per person. However, if you have three or four people all headed for the same place, you may be able to negotiate a reduced rate for the entire group. [lonely planet]

Professional Groups & Events

Professional Groups & Events

Hacks Hackers La Paz – The world of hackers and journalists come together as information becomes digital and Internet companies become media empires. Journalists call themselves “hacks,” someone who can “cut” words in any situation. Hackers use programming codes to process available materials. This meeting space between hackers and journalists tries to unite the two worlds. [meetup]

La Paz BlockChain Meetup – There is a whole lot of hype around Blockchain. But how does it work? What is a smart contract? Why is everyone so excited about DAOs? And what does all of this have to do with cryptocurrencies? [meetup]

La Paz JavaScript Meetup – Any one , that want to learn and develop over this Third Generation NoSQL should be involved in this Group. People, from other generations MongoDB, firebase or other welcome to share use cases and features… [meetup]

Language Exchange

Language Exchange

Your Expat Community in Bolivia – Hola! And a warm welcome to InterNations’ expat community in Bolivia! As a platform that welcomes expatriates from Bolivia and around the world, InterNations is here to help make your cultural transition easier. Whether you’re about to head to Santa Cruz, La Paz, or elsewhere, our members will answer some of the questions you’re dying to ask before making the plunge. [internations]

LGBT Groups

LGBT Groups

Igualdad LGBT – The Foundation EQUALITY LGBT arises from the lack of an institution that upholds human rights of affective-sexual and gender in Santa Cruz de la Sierra, Bolivia diversities. [igualdad lgbt]

Resources

Resources

Places in Bolivia

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