Haiti

Etymology

The name Haïti (or Hayti) comes from the indigenous Taíno language which was the native name given to the entire island of Hispaniola to mean, “land of high mountains.” The h is silent in French and the ï in Haïti, is a diacritical mark used to show that the second vowel is pronounced separately, as in the word naïve. In English, this rule for the pronunciation is often disregarded, thus the spelling Haiti is used and pronounced as “Hay-ti”. [wikipedia]

Places to Meet People

Places to Meet People

Ayiti Bitcoin Meetup – This meetup is for anyone interested in Bitcoin. Entrepreneurs, small business owners, web developers or just anyone who wants to learn about this revolutionary new financial technology. Whether you’ve been a Bitcoin expert for years or have never heard of it and just want to learn more, this group is for you. [meetup]

How to Find a Date

How to Find a Date

Free Online Dating in Haiti – Connecting Singles is a 100% FREE online dating site where you can make friends and meet Haiti singles. Find an activity partner, new friends, a cool date or a soulmate, for a casual or long term relationship. Meet quality singles in your Haiti area or worldwide (US singles, Canada singles, UK singles, singles in Western Europe and Australia) looking for online dating, friendship, love, marriage, romance, or just someone to chat or hang out with. [connecting singles]

Haiti Dating – At HaitiDating.com, we excel at helping you find your match safely and quickly. Through our extensive profiles, members can learn about each other before meeting in person. Our great quality assurance and customer service means all you have to worry about is looking good in your photo. [haiti dating]

Walking Tours

Walking Tours

Highlights of Haiti – There is a place in the Caribbean where the tourists don’t go; a tropical, rugged place of waterfalls, secret caves, and mountains that scrape the sky. It’s a place of bold flavours, intoxicating music, mischievous gods, and colourful art; where the only thing stronger than the rum is the spirit of the people who live there. [g adventures]

Wild Frontiers – Like many of the destinations we offer, Haiti is a country which is widely perceived in a negative light. But look a little deeper or talk to anyone who has actually been there and you will soon realise that the reality of what you are likely to experience on the ground promises something very different. [wild frontiers travel]

Free Things to Do

Free Things to Do

Conquer the Pic la Selle – Clocking up a whopping 2,680 meters above sea level, the Pic la Selle is the highest point in Haiti’s Chaine de la Selle, and one of the highest in the entire Caribbean region to boot. It looms and towers close to the border with the Dominican Republic, and comes crisscrossed by a series of surprisingly accessible tracks and trekking trails. [the crazy tourist]

Cool off in the Bassin Bleu – Just a short jaunt away from the elegant Victorian mansions and old coffee depots of Jacmel, the Bassin Bleu sits concealed in the rocky hills of Haiti. Gushing and shooting in jets of water, the cataract is a part of the Petite Riviere that runs through the mountains of the south. [the crazy tourist]

Explore Fort Jacques – Although smaller than its big brother, the colossal La Citadelle la Ferriere, Fort Jacques remains a striking remnant of the great castle building age of Haiti. Like its compadre on the hill, it was raised by the nationalist powers of the country to fend of French attack in the first decade of the 19th century. [the crazy tourist]

Get your fix of art and craft at Jacmel – Sat on the south coast just a short drive from the capital at Port-au-Prince, pretty little Jacmel (a tentative addition to the UNESCO World Heritage list no less) is the reigning arts and crafts kingpin of all Haiti. [the crazy tourist]

Go on Voodoo pilgrimage to Saut-d’Eau – Crashing in two mighty streams through the tropical greenery of central Haiti, the Saut-d’Eau are not only famed for their breath-taking natural beauty but also their religious significance.Held in esteem by both local Voodooists and Catholics, the falls become the focus of a mass pilgrimage each July, when the Our Lady of Carmel festivities take place and Voodoo practitioners come to bathe in the cleansing streams. [the crazy tourist]

Grab a bite on Gelee Beach – Gelee Beach (known locally as Les Cayes) is best-known for the rambunctious meringue music festival that erupts between its lawns and beaches each year, drawing in kompas bands and dancers aplenty. However, the little spot on the southern shore is a real treat no matter the month, largely thanks to the smattering of conch and seafood eateries that ring its sands. [the crazy tourist]

Haggle around the Marche an Fer – Rising in a mass of red and green iron in the very midst of the Haitian capital, the historic Marche an Fer still pulses with local life and produce throughout the week. Now considered something of a national symbol, this colossal bazaar was first raised in the 1890s (notice the curious oriental architectural style – the building was originally intended for Cairo, Egypt!). Since then it’s hosted some of the best craft and food stalls on the island. [the crazy tourist]

Hike the Furcy Forest – Adventure travelers heading to Haiti should be sure to make a beeline for the colossal Massif de la Selle, where the legendary Furcy Forest can be found cascading down the ridges and peaks which rise to more than 2,500 meters above the Caribbean Sea. [the crazy tourist]

Scale the La Citadelle la Ferriere – Clinging like a great stone limpet to the ridges of Bonnet a L’Eveque mountain a short drive south out of Cap-Haitien, this colossal fortress (one of the largest in the entire Americas in fact) rarely fails to draw a gasp. [the crazy tourist]

Stroll the Grand Rue Musee d’Art – The so-called Grand Rue Musee d’Art can be found sandwiched in the midst of Port-au-Prince’s urban sprawl by a colossal auto repair shop on one side and a junkyard on the other. Its grandiose name might suggest something regal and historic, but that couldn’t be further from the truth. [the crazy tourist]

Taste a famous export at the Barbancourt Distillery – With almost two centuries of trading history, the Barbancourt label is amongst the most iconic in all of Haiti.Now sold all over the world, this Hispaniolan version of the Caribbean’s most famous liqueur is best sampled in its home: The Barbancourt Distillery in the district of Petionville, Port-au-Prince. [the crazy tourist]

Taste that Creole kitchen at Lakay – Set to the sounds of reggaeton and samba (played only by local bands, of course), little Lakay is a charming and earthy eatery in Cap-Haitien that’s famed for its mastery of the Creole kitchen. Ignore the smattering of Italian pizzas on the menu and go for that spiced chicken or the lobster salad topped with cashews – regional favorites. [the crazy tourist]

Tour the Sans-Souci Palace – Nestled in the northern hills close to the mighty Citadelle la Ferriere, which towers high on the mountaintops above, this crumbling palatial complex was once the home of Henri Christophe, the Haitian king and leader during the wars of independence against the French. [the crazy tourist]

Unwind in Labadee – Magnet for cruise ships and a favorite of beachcombers, little Labadee is a privately-owned enclave of sand, sea and sun that comes under the Royal Caribbean International banner. It can be found cut-off form the north coast and Cap-Haitien by a ring of high mountains, separated from the rest of Haiti by a low fence. [the crazy tourist]

Whiz up on local history at the Musee du Pantheon National Haitien – If you only intend on hitting one museum when in Haiti, make it the acclaimed Musee du Pantheon National Haitien. This large concrete building in Port-au-Prince is topped with white cones and mosaic decorations, and houses the country’s most in-depth collections pertaining to national history. [the crazy tourist]

Festivals

Festivals

Carifesta – Carifesta is a festival for and about the people, an exuberant extravaganza of Caribbean art, music and dance. The event uses Caribbean performance culture as a point of unity between the many regions of the islands. The event is always long lasting; the first Carifesta in Guyana lasted for three weeks. The next Carifesta was held in Jamaica in 1976 and lasted 11 days, while the third took place in Cuba in 1979 and lasted for two weeks. [the culture trip]

Carnival – Haitian carnival is a celebration held over the several weeks leading up to Mardi Gras, or Shrove Tuesday. It’s an electrifying expression of color and community which sees locals adorned in kaleidoscopic costumes and parading the streets. A show of extravagance and indulgence before the Lenten fasting period begins, the largest Carnival in Haiti is celebrated in Port-au-Prince, with many more smaller scale festivities occurring in all parts of the island. [the culture trip]

Jacmel Film Festival – The Jacmel Film Festival is a Haitian gala to celebrate contemporary world cinema whilst simultaneously providing cultural insight through film. The festival is attended by approximately 50,000 people each year, and is used as a springboard by Haitian filmmakers to achieve international recognition. [the culture trip]

Krik? Krak! Festival – The interesting name of this festival can leave many confused, just what exactly does Krik? Krak! mean? The words are a traditional Haitian response to storytelling; when someone is ready to recite a part of their folklore, they will declare “krik?”, and the listeners will respond with “krak!” The festival is geared toward familial celebration and folkloric storytelling, and is full of evenings of music and stories. [the culture trip]

Le Festival du Rhum Haiti – Inspired by the Paris Rum Fest and the Festival of cane in Martinique, the Haitian Rum festival is a celebration of alcoholic beverages from across the coast. Started in 2014, the event features tastings, workshops and cooking demonstrations by renowned rum experts. [the culture trip]

Port-au-Prince International Jazz Festival – The Port-au-Prince International Jazz Festival is a musical extravaganza, aiming to both promote Jazz in Haiti and to increase the understanding between Haitian and American cultures. Held for the first time in 2007, the festival features free concerts and workshops to educate visitors about music. [the culture trip]

Rara – Rara is a series of music festivals in Haiti which are held numerous times over the Lenten period. They involve native Haitian instruments including bamboo trumpets, drums, bells and maracas. Songs are always performed in Haitian Kreyòl and typically celebrate the African ancestry of the Afro-Haitian masses. [the culture trip]

Public Transit

Public Transit

Bus – The main method of public transportation is the city bus.  Visitors are forewarned, however, that this bus is unlike standard city buses in many major western cities. There are bus terminals where visitors can get the bus, primarily located in Port-au-prince and Cap-Haitien, although they are also located in other areas of Haiti. [tripadvisor]

Professional Groups & Events

Professional Groups & Events

Haitian-American Professional Network – The Haitian American Professional Network (HAPN) supports and advocates for the economic and social empowerment of the Haitian-American community in the Chicagoland metro-area through community networking & organizing, and membership development. [facebook]

Language Exchange

Language Exchange

Your Expat Community in Haiti – Bonjour and welcome to InterNations Haiti! Here, through connections with other Haiti expats, we hope to offer answers to any concerns and questions you might have before you move, such as, ʺhow is the country still affected by the 2010 earthquake?”, “which are the best schools in Gonaives?ʺ, or “what’s the best way to find a house?ʺ. Moving to another country is a fantastic adventure, and InterNations is able to provide you with all the information you need to make your adventure as enjoyable as possible. [internations]

LGBT Groups

LGBT Groups

Resources

Resources

Places in Haiti

Find More