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Bahamas - Life of a Digital Nomad | Work - Travel - Repeat

Bahamas

Bahamas

Etymology

The name Bahamas is derived from either the Taino ba ha ma (“big upper middle land”), which was a term for the region used by the indigenous Amerindians, or from the Spanish baja mar (“shallow water or sea” or “low tide”) reflecting the shallow waters of the area. Alternatively, it may originate from Guanahani, a local name of unclear meaning. In English, the Bahamas is one of only two countries whose self-standing short name begins with the word “the”, along with The Gambia. [wikipedia]

Places to Meet People

Places to Meet People

Buddhism in The Bahamas – Hi Folks – we have a new Facebook page called Bahamas Community of Mindfulness so please join in and Like us over there as well. [meetup]

Nassau Documentary Films Meetup – Let’s begin the process of interactive learning to inspire lifestyle changes in the way we produce documentaries on culture, spirituality and new communication platforms. [meetup]

How to Find a Date

How to Find a Date

Connecting Singles – Have you tried all the traditional ways to find someone special in Bahamas? Are you tired of the Bahamas bar & club scene, coming home to an empty house, lonely tables-for-one at those romantic Bahamas restaurants, disastrous blind dates set up by your matchmaking friends, Bahamas local singles groups, singles events and meetings with no results?? [connecting singles]

Date Hookup – If you’re single in Bahama and haven’t tried us yet, why not try now? You have nothing to lose! We’re a totally free dating site in Bahamas. [date hookup]

Mingle2 – Why pay for online dating? At Mingle2, you can meet, chat, and date attractive, fun-loving singles in Bahamas for FREE. Claim your free account in 30 seconds, upload a photo, and start finding singles in Bahamas today. [mingle2]

Walking Tours

Walking Tours

Island Routes – Captivate your senses and allow your taste buds to be your guide as you explore the best of Nassau’s local eateries and experience the true history and culture of the island. Learn about authentic Bahamian dishes from chefs and local artisans who prepare and preserve their cuisine, always keeping their cultural traditions in mind. [island routes]

Nassau Tours – Embark on a tour of the senses with divine dishes and alluring art. Get a double serving of Bahamian culture with a delicious twist. [nassau tours]

Tru Bahamian Food Tours – We offer unique local culinary experiences in a safe, sustainable, and environmentally responsible manner. Our meticulously crafted tours take you along our island’s less-travelled paths and allow us to share with you the most authentic and delicious version of The Bahamas. [tru bahamian food tours]

Free Things to Do

Free Things to Do

Cabbage Beach – Cabbage Beach on Paradise Island is arguably the most popular shore of the Bahamas. It’s flanked by hotels, eateries and water activities galore. Seems like there’d be accessible bathrooms, right? Wrong. If you have the urge, you’ll have to beg for pity at one of the hotels. Looking for a comfortable perch? Plan on shelling out approximately $10 USD to rent a beach chair. How about some shade? That’ll run you around $20. Luckily, swimming is free. [us news travel]

Cable Beach – Cable Beach isn’t the most picturesque waterfront on the Bahamas, but it is well-stocked. Located between Nassau and the airport along New Providence’s north coast, the stretch of beach is near golf courses, casinos and restaurants. Travelers are also plenty pleased with the view, not to mention the white sand and crystal clear waters. [us news travel]

Christ Church Cathedral – If you’re up for a bit of sightseeing, make the journey to Christ Church Cathedral in Nassau. Originally built in 1670, Christ Church Cathedral was restored as recently as the 1990s. And the mahogany pews you’ll spot upon entry are replicas of the originals. [us news travel]

Junkanoo – If you’re traveling to the Bahamas over the winter holidays, travelers urge you to partake in Junkanoo. Held all over the islands with the biggest celebration taking place on Bay Street in Nassau, Junkanoo is a night parade held on Boxing Day (Dec. 26), New Year’s Day and then again in the summertime. Young and old Bahamians spend months making elaborate (but disposable) costumes for the parades, then take to the islands’ streets to dance, blare conch-shell horns, beat goatskin drums and clank cowbells. [us news travel]

Lucayan National Park – There are three national parks on Grand Bahama, but this is the definitive favorite. A 40-acre spread of mangroves, palm and pine trees, Freeport’s Lucayan National Park also contains lovely white sand beaches, the impressive Gold Rock Beach and one of the longest underwater limestone caves in the world. [us news travel]

Marine Habitat at Atlantis – How often do you find 14 lagoons, countless caves and more than 50,000 marine animals in one place? Probably not very often. Good news: the Marine Habitat at Atlantis may be your big chance to knock “visit giant marine life complex” off the bucket list. Feed and pet stingrays in a shallow pool, interact with sea turtles in the Hibiscus Lagoon and ride through an underwater tube in the shark habitat. [us news travel]

Port Lucaya Marketplace – Shoppers, rejoice! There are more than 80 stores to lose yourselves in at the Port Lucaya Marketplace of Grand Bahama Island. Duty-free perfume and jewelry are the most popular purchases at Freeport’s Port Lucaya. But you can also buy some Bahamian straw crafts in many of the 12 island-style buildings that make up this shopping complex. Recent visitors say that you should be ready to bargain because after a little finagling you may find yourself a better deal. [us news travel]

The Dolphin Experience – Take your animal-loving children to the Dolphin Experience on Grand Bahama Island, where they can interact with some friendly Atlantic bottlenose dolphins in one of the largest dive programs in the Caribbean. Recent visitors praise the professional and informative staff as well as the well-behaved dolphins. Many visitors enjoy the humane, open-water swim (as opposed to in an enclosed pen) and say that the pricey interactive program is worth the money. [us news travel]

Thunderball Grotto – Never say never again when asked if you’ve been to Thunderball Grotto — this top snorkeling and scuba diving destination reached Hollywood fame for its appearance in two James Bond flicks (“Thunderball” and “Never Say Never Again”). The intricate, underwater maze located on Staniel Cay is enclosed by sky-high cave ceilings with holes just big enough to let the sun shine through and reflect off the water. [us news travel]

Festivals

Festivals

All Andros Crab Festival – If the idea of eating crabs cooked 101 different ways whets your appetite, then head to Andros Island in the Bahamas on the second weekend in June, when the Andros Crab Festival goes off. This celebration of large-land crabs fills up Queen’s Park in Fresh Creek (about two miles from Andros Town Airport, which is a quick 15-minute air hop from Nassau) with over 50 colorful food booths and plenty of jubilant musical acts. Taste local dishes like crab soup or crab and dough, learn all about the life cycle of the land crabs, and check out the cooking competition, as Bahamian chefs battle it out for the title of best crab dish. There’s even a crab release, with over 1,000 crabs set loose among the revelers — just try to catch one without getting pinched. [shermans travel]

Eleuthera Pineapple Festival – On the island of Eleuthera, about 50 miles east of Nassau, local Bahamians have celebrated the island’s pineapple industry for nearly 30 years with a lively get-together. The Eleuthera Pineapple Festival happens over the first weekend of June, as farmers bring plenty of the spiky sweet fruit into Gregory Town and join in the merriment. There’s music, pineapple-eating contests, a cycling classic, beauty pageants, and cooking competitions going on during this long-weekend event. Be sure to ask before you bite in, as some of the Bahamian pineapple dishes come spiced with some serious heat. [shermans travel]

Fox Hill Day Festival – Bahamians celebrate their 1838 emancipation from British slavery with the annual Fox Hill Day Festival: an all-day party that’s always held on the second Tuesday of August in the Fox Hill neighborhood of Nassau. Visitors will find that the event begins with church services, and after giving thanks, children “plait the maypole,” with ribbons while men work to climb it for a monetary prize. All along, there’s plenty of local Bahamian foods to taste, music to experience, and — the thing that makes the Bahamas so special — everyone dancing in the streets. [shermans travel]

Junkanoo and Junkanoo Carnival – The Junkanoo parade in Nassau — yes, the same one you saw James Bond experience in Thunderball — has been an integral part of the fabric of the Bahamas for centuries. Some say it’s been celebrated on Boxing Day and New Year’s Day for over 500 years, while others date it to the 1700s when slaves were given a Christmas holiday and began the tradition of masked, costumed, musical revelry in the streets. These days, it’s a wildly exciting visual feast that begins at 2 a.m. and rolls until 10 a.m., as various clubs — made up of up to 1,000 members — don their crepe paper, feather, and cardboard costumes and masks; grab their homemade goatskin drums, cowbells and rake-and-scrape percussion instruments, and dance into the streets. It’s a fabulous spectacle and entices revelers to dance the night away; smaller versions are also held on Bimini, Grand Bahama Island and in the Exumas and the Abacos islands. [shermans travel]

The Bahamas International Film Festival – Since 2004, the Bahamas International Film Festival (BIFF) has been celebrating cinema with a weeklong showcase of movies and short films from around the world. Usually held during the first week of December, the BIFF offers screenings, seminars, educational forums, and parties, all designed to bring the culture of cinema to Nassau and beyond. Hollywood stars flock to the BIFF, including Sean Connery (who has a home in Nassau), Johnny Depp, Anna Faris, Naomie Harris, and many others, who jump at the chance to combine their love of film with a trip to paradise. [shermans travel]

Public Transit

Public Transit

By bike – Bicycle rental is not popular and not recommended as traffic is bad, there are many blind corners in the old streets of Nassau, and cars drive recklessly and on the left side of the road, which you may not be used to. [wikitravel]

By car – You could also rent a car. All major U.S car rental shops are in Nassau. Worthy of note for travelers from the UK is the very British feel of the roads. Unlike the nearby US, cars drive on the left side of the road, have UK road signs and even the odd roundabout. [wikitravel]

By minibus – Minibuses (locally know as jitneys) act as the bus system of Nassau city and New Providence island. Jitneys are found on and near Bay Street. The famous #10 Jitney to Cable Beach loads passengers on George & Bay Streets (in front of McDonalds, across from the British Colonial Hilton). Other jitneys are located on Charlotte & Bay Streets. [wikitravel]

By scooter – Scooter (small motorcycle) rental is also popular in Nassau. [wikitravel]

By taxi – Taxis, often minivans and always identifiable by their yellow license plates and little Gothic blackletter “Taxi” lettering, roam the streets of Nassau. They’re equipped with meters but will usually refuse to use them, so agree on the fare in advance. Expect to pay $15-$20 for even the shortest of trips from downtown to Cable beach. [wikitravel]

By water taxi – A water taxi service is an available alternative to a taxi to get to Paradise Island from downtown. It is picked up under the bridge and costs $6 round trip. The water taxi stops operating at 6PM. [wikitravel]

Professional Groups & Events

Professional Groups & Events

Professional Associates Realty- PAR Bahamas – Offering professional and efficient services, for all your real estate needs throughout the Bahamas! Residential and Commercial, Sales and Rentals! [facebook]

Language Exchange

Language Exchange

Expats Bahamas – The Expats in the Bahamas page was created to inform, educate and connect Local Bahamians, expatriates, and people from around the world who are either planning on visiting our islands or live abroad making Nassau, Freeport or even one of the family islands of the Bahamas their second home. [facebook]

Living and Working in Bahamas – Expat living in Bahamas raises plenty of questions, for instance: ʺWhat are the requirements from Bahamian authorities to get a residence permit?”, ʺIs there a British women’s group in Nassau?ʺ, or ”Who can recommend international schools in town?” [internations]

Living in Bahamas – The Bahamas is well-known tourist spot where people go to get away from the hustle and bustle of real life. Some people just decide to stay and make their living in the warm climate. Most expats who move to the Bahamas do so in order to get involved in the tourism industry, start their own business or work in financial services. Many just move here to get away from city living because life in the Bahamas is easy and the paperwork is kept to a minimum. Check out our easy-to-follow guide to Barbados. [expat woman]

Nassau Spanish Speaking/Learning Meetup – We get together and learn about the Spanish speaking culture out there while doing different activities we love i.e. dog play, camping, biking, hiking, kayaking, cooking, baking, dancing, reading – everything that makes fun for everybody while just speaking SPANISH. [meetup]

LGBT Groups

LGBT Groups

Bahamas LGBT Equality Advocates – A non-profit LGBT support and advocacy organization in The Bahamas. [facebook]

Resources

Resources

Places in Bahamas

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