Uzbekistan

Uzbekistan

Etymology

Uncertain; possibly from Turkic uz (“genuine”) + Sogdian bek (“master”). The suffix is known to be from Persian ستان (stān, “-stan”). [wiktionary]

Places to Meet People

Places to Meet People

Caffe il Migliore – Cafe, Italian Restaurant in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. [facebook]

Tashkent Toastmasters (TKTM) – Toastmasters is an international organization that helps you develop your presentation skills, communication skills, leadership skills, impromptu speaking skills, and many other skills! Tashkent Toastmasters is open to anyone who can communicate in English and who wishes to improve their communication and leadership skills. [meetup]

How to Find a Date

How to Find a Date

Uzbek Dating – Are you single from Uzbekistan and wondering how to change that status to “happily taken”? Are you far away from Uzbekistan but captivated by the stunning natural beauty most native Uzbek men and women possess? Either way, you need look no further. Uzbek Dating is the largest, fastest growing website for men and women from Uzbekistan you’ll find anywhere. [uzbek dating]

Uzbekistan Dating – With people of so many different ethnicities hailing from Uzbekistan, it can be hard to meet single Uzbeks in one place—until now, that is! Uzbekistan Dating was created to help Uzbek men and women meet one another as well as others for good times and romance. And the best part about it? It’s totally free to enjoy all of our services! [uzbekistan dating]

Walking Tours

Walking Tours

Advantour – Tashkent is a strange mixture of a modern metropolis and the unique color of the eastern city. Taking a walk in Tashkent, you will see graceful European constructions of Turkestan Governorate General, monumental buildings of the Soviet era, blue domes of mosques and madrasahs, and glittering facades of modern buildings. [advantour]

Tours By Locals – Hi my name is Timur. I’m Bukharian and I have born and lived in Bukhara. I’m a private tour guide, and I offer personal walking and historical tours in Bukhara, Samarkand, Khiva and Tashkent cities. This is my part time occupation and part times I work for tour agencies. [tours by locals]

Free Things to Do

Free Things to Do

Bukhara City Tour – The sheer quantity of sights here means most visitors cannot see everything. One of the city’s most recognisable monuments is the Kalon mosque and minaret complex. Climbing up this 46 metre ornamental minaret rewards you with a stunning view over the whole city and the biggest Friday mosque in Bukhara. [audley travel]

Khiva Walking Tour – Khiva is a walker’s town, with most of the monuments within a short distance of each other. The minaret is Khiva’s highest point and, if you can climb all 118 steps, you will be rewarded with a panoramic view of the town and the desert beyond. [audley travel]

Opera or Ballet Trip – The Alisher Navoi Opera House is one of Tashkent’s most picturesque buildings. It was originally built by Japanese and Korean prisoners of war in 1947 to the design of Shchusev, the man who built Lenin’s tomb. [audley travel]

Samarkand City Tour – Unlike Bukhara, where walking from sight to sight is possible, Samarkand’s attractions are spread right across the city. Starting in the centre, the Mosque of Bibi Khanym dominates the skyline. It was once the biggest mosque in the world and has been partially rebuilt with UNESCO help. [audley travel]

Tashkent City Tour – Tashkent sprawls in all directions from its focal point – Amir Timur Square. It is here that you can see Uzbekistan’s curious elevation of Tamerlane to national hero. [audley travel]

Urgut Excursion – Not far from Samarkand, high in the hills next to the Tajik border, is the town of Urgut. It has one of the best rural markets in Uzbekistan and the people here have their own distinct culture. [audley travel]

Festivals

Festivals

Boysun Bahori – Many local or provincial celebrations take place in various parts of Uzbekistan during spring. The biggest and perhaps the most culturally significant event is the Boysun Bahori, or the Boysun Spring Festival. Held in mountainous Boysun in Surkhandarya Province, this festival dates back to pre-Islam times and features costumes, songs, dance performances, storytelling, and other local traditions which have withstood the test of time. This event is so steeped in the region’s history and culture that UNESCO has named the Boysun cultural space as a Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity. 
 [iexplore]

Independence Day – Independence Day, held every September 1, is the biggest national holiday as the entire country remembers the day when it gained its independence and sovereignty after a long era of Soviet occupation. Feasts and shows are held in many cities and towns, but it is in Alisher Navoiy National Park in Tashkent where the main event takes place. From this park, the president addresses the nation, after which performances from the country’s singers and actors take place, along with a large fireworks display. [iexplore]

Navruz – Another New Year celebration held all across Uzbekistan is the Navruz (also Navroz, Nowruz, and many other variations). The word ‘navruz’ means ‘new day’ in Iranian, so naturally Navruz is Iranian New Year. Held every March 21, Navruz is an auspicious event for many Uzbeks because it is at this time of year they pin hopes of revival and renewal. All over the country, families and local communities prepare sumptuous feasts for all to enjoy. [iexplore]

New Year – Uzbeks have a particularly curious New Year festival called the Yillar. Traditions normally carried out during Christmas in other countries take place in Uzbekistan during the New Year. These traditions include putting up what is essentially a Christmas tree with lots of decorations. Uzbeks also exchange gifts during this time and at some feasts, a man in a Santa costume joins in the merriment. [iexplore]

Ramadan and Eid ul-Fitr – As with any Islamic country, Uzbeks also observe Ramadan, the Muslim holy month of fasting, abstinence, and prayer. It culminates in a festival called Eid ul-Fitr, which sees families unite in large celebratory feasts. As these festivals follow the lunar calendar, dates for Ramadan and Eid ul-Fitr change every year. [iexplore]

Shark Taronalari – Shark Taronalari is Uzbekistan’s international world music festival. First held in 1997 in Samarkand, the festival has attracted a growing number of performers and participants through the years. It usually takes place every summer. Folk singers who practice traditional musical genres such as uran khai (throat singing) and makom (sacred classical, melodic Uzbek music) come to the festival to perform. [iexplore]

Public Transit

Public Transit

Bus & Marshrutka – Clapped-out state buses are fast disappearing from Uzbek roads, undercut by a boom in private buses that do not keep schedules and leave when full. They are newer and more comfortable, but can be slow as drivers and touts are preoccupied with overselling seats and transporting cargo and contraband. [lonely planet]

Car – Hiring your own car (with driver) is possible, provided you have insurance from your home country and a valid international driving licence. Be prepared for the same kind of hassles you’ll experience anywhere in the former Soviet Union: lots of random stops and traffic cops fishing for bribes. There are no car-rental agencies, so you’ll need to hire a taxi, which is generally affordable even for several days on end; budget around US$60 per day (excluding petrol). Driving is on the right. [lonely planet]

Shared & Ordinary Taxi – Shared taxis save tons of time but are, of course, more costly than buses. They ply all the main intercity routes and also congregate at most border points. They leave when full from set locations – usually from near bus stations – and run all day and often through the night. Prices fluctuate throughout the day/week/month/year, increasing towards the evening, on weekends and on holidays. You can buy all four seats in a shared taxi if you’re in a hurry or just prefer to travel in comfort – this is the standard way most travellers with a midrange budget get around in Uzbekistan as prices remain low. [lonely planet]

Train – Trains are perhaps the most comfortable and safest method of intercity transport. The express (skorostnoy, or ‘high-speed’) trains between Tashkent, Samarkand and Bukhara, with airplane-style seating, are faster than a shared taxi and a lot more comfortable. Book a couple of days in advance – they’re popular. These have 2nd-class, 1st-class and deluxe ‘SV’ class (private compartment) seating. First class is not noticeably more comfortable than 2nd class. [lonely planet]

Professional Groups & Events

Professional Groups & Events

Language Exchange

Language Exchange

LangArt Educational Group – We teach English with speed, faith, skill & talent. [facebook]

LGBT Groups

LGBT Groups

Resources

Resources

Places in Uzbekistan

Find More  
Skip to toolbar