Sudan

Sudan

Etymology

1842, from Arabic Bilad-al-sudan, literally “country of the blacks” (originally the stretch of Africa between the Sahara and the equator), from sud, plural of aswad (fem. sauda) “black.” In early use also Soudan, from French. [online etymology dictionary]

Places to Meet People

Places to Meet People

al-Khartum Biblical Christianity Meetup – This is a group that wants to learn more about the Bible, and what it means. The group will meet to discuss practical christian living and what it means to be a Christian in Sudan. [meetup]

al-Khartum “Why We Live” in Buddhism Meetup – Are you searching for meaning in your life? Have you ever felt happiness in your life… …never lasts? This Buddhist group has a great positive, multi-cultural atmosphere that helps people search for the answer to life’s biggest questions. Through the teachings of Buddha and historical Pure Land Buddhist teachers we understand better the direction our life needs to take in order to find the purpose of life. [meetup]

AlHoush – Restaurant in Omdurman, Al Kharţūm, Sudan. [facebook]

How to Find a Date

How to Find a Date

Sudan Dating – Black is beautiful! These three words are powerful and would certainly melt any Sudanese’ heart. The pleasure that comes with dating a Sudanese girl is immeasurable; locally, they say the taller she is the better thus highly valued. Sudanese single girls are beautiful, exciting and sexy. Their deep and dark skin is their identity which, combined with their African curvy frames; they become utterly irresistible for any man looking for some real love, romance, and meaningful relationship. [sudan.arab.dating]

Sudanese Dating – The Web’s favorite place for Sudanese dating worldwide. Whether you’re new to this or finding out about LoveHabibi for the first time, signup free today and connect with other people from Sudan looking for free online dating and find your very own LoveHabibi. [love habibi]

Walking Tours

Walking Tours

Lupine Travel – From the vibrancy of the the capital Khartoum, to the ancient Nubian pyramids and overwhelmingly friendly people throughout the country, Sudan has a huge amount to offer as a tourist destination. [lupine travel]

Sudanese Treasures – Enjoy the city tour of Khartoum and Omdurman then drive to and explore the ancient cultic centres of Nagaa , Mussawarat and enjoy the magic of tenting and stay overnight in front of the pyramids of ‎Meroe. Afterwards enjoy the route which leads through the Bayouda desert, crossing the Nile to visit the ancient temples and tombs. [elite tour club]

Free Things to Do

Free Things to Do

Dinder National Park – One of the largest national parks on the continent, covering a grand total of over 2500 square miles, Dinder National Park is Sudan’s pride and joy. Perfect for adventure activities like hiking and wildlife safaris, the park is a nature lover’s heaven. Home to such wild animals as lions, elephants, kudu, leopards, and antelopes, as well as myriad different bird species, the park seems like something out of a beloved children’s book. Travelers can book trips for as long as they are comfortable with, with facilities inside the park for those who would like to stay overnight. [iexplore]

Jebel Marra – The highest peak in southwestern Darfur, Jebel Marra stands at a whopping 10,000 feet. Not only is the mountain great for such activities as hiking and mountain climbing, but the area is stunning as well, boasting such natural formations as waterfalls and volcanic lakes. While the region is currently experiencing political instability, the mountain should be bookmarked as it is a great find in a land that is so geographically flat. [iexplore]

National Museum, Khartoum – Anyone wanting to learn about the history of this interesting and complicated country should head to the National Museum in Khartoum. Even though the building is relatively small when compared to the ones which surround and tower above it, the contents speak bounds. The museum is home to several informative exhibits chronicling the country’s journey from its beginning during the Pharaonic era to modern day Sudan. Travelers can take in many ancient artifacts, including original stone carvings and numerous Christian frescoes. The gardens in which the museum is located boast several temples which are well worth a visit. [iexplore]

Omdurman – Omdurman, the largest city in the country, was formed in 1881 by the Mahdi and was once the Sudanese nation’s capital. Today, this old Muslim city has been wonderfully preserved and offers travelers a look back into a life before our time. There are many attractions in the old city, including the largest market in the country, Souk Moowaileh, and several museums chronicling the country’s historical, cultural, and ethnographic histories. Anyone who would like a historical tour of the country, all in one place, should head to Omdurman, where the country’s past is nicely condensed. [iexplore]

Pyramids of Meroe – By far the most popular tourist draw in the country, the Pyramids of Meroe are one of the last remaining symbols from an ancient civilization. Built by the Meroitic Pharaohs around 500 BC, the pyramids are different from their counterparts in neighboring Egypt. They display steep brick sides and appear in groups of 12. The site is not nearly as touristy as the Egyptian landmarks, and travelers won’t have to fight off tourist touts to see them. Travelers are permitted to enter the pyramids, in which ancient graffiti and hieroglyphics can be seen. [iexplore]

Red Sea – Famous perhaps mostly for being the subject of biblical stories, the Red Sea is a great tourist attraction. Biblical appeal aside, however, the sea is also a gorgeous piece of the country’s natural environment. With crystal clear waters and some of the most interesting species of fish and stunning coral reefs, it is no wonder that the Red Sea has become particularly busy in the past few years. There are many lovely resorts in the Port Sudan and Erkowit areas for travelers who would like to extend their stay at this beautiful and historically significant body of water. [iexplore]

Festivals

Festivals

Eid al-Adha (Feast of the Sacrifice) – Another important Islamic day, this time in October, is the Feast of the Sacrifice. The story in the Koran which tells the tale of Ibrahim and his willingness to sacrifice his first-born son to Allah resonates strongly with people of the Islamic faith. So strongly that believers around Sudan slaughter sheep and hold great feasts with family and friends. The festival usually lasts for two to three days, during which time there are several trips to the mosque. [iexplore]

Eid al-Fitr (End of Ramadan) – Sudan is an Islamic nation, which is why Eid al-Fitr, a holiday celebrating the end of the holy month Ramadan and the end of the fasting period, is a big deal. Celebrations are held all over the country in August, with mass ceremonies taking place in mosques everywhere. The main events on the day are largely family-based, with families gathering for a veritable feast, the exchange of gifts, and a look back at the month and what it meant in their lives. [iexplore]

Mawlid an-Nabi – Kicking off the Sudanese festival calendar in February is Mawlid an-Nabi, which celebrates the day the Prophet Mohammed was born. This is one of the few Islamic celebrations in which travelers can partake as the festivities are taken out of the home and into the streets. Stalls with food and sweets line the streets and locals dance and sing until late into the night. The atmosphere is electric and the day is undoubtedly enjoyed by all. [iexplore]

Sham Al Nassim the Spring Holiday – Held every year in April is the popular Spring Holiday, which takes place the very first Monday after the Christian Easter holiday. The reason for the festival is yet to be determined but that does not deter locals and travelers alike from having a swell of a time. The day is characterized by displays of music, dance, and all-round festiveness. [iexplore]

Sufi Holiya Festival – Also in October is the traditional Sufi music and dance festival. The Holiya festival is a mass display of cultural brotherhood and kinship. Held in honor of Sudanese saints and sheiks, the festival is characterized by the gathering of people of all ethnicities and social rankings, who dance and hug in the street. This part of the festival is called Hadra. The festival-goers sing along to traditional hymns and songs – called qasaids – and hold a large parade that passes through many culturally significant landmarks. For travelers, this really is one of the most spiritually uplifting and most inspiring traditions to witness in the region. [iexplore]

Public Transit

Public Transit

By bicycle – It is possible to cycle around Sudan, legally speaking, although it might be advisable to forget to mention your mode of transport when getting your permit to travel. “Cycling” will often consist of pushing the bike through sand or rattling along corrugations but the scenery and the warmth of the Sudanese people may compensate for the physical and bureaucratic hassles. [wikitravel]

By bus – While buses do run frequently in the better travelled areas, in remoter areas people tend to use trucks or “boxes” (Toyota Hiluxes) – they’re usually just as crowded as the buses but have fewer people sitting on top and get stuck in the sand less often. They tend to go whenever they fill up, which can take half a day or so. If you have money to spare, you can hire a whole one to yourself. [wikitravel]

By car – Driving in Sudan is chaotic but not especially dangerous by African standards. Visitors to the area who are inexperienced at international driving are advised to hire a taxi or a driver. In most of the country, a 4WD is essential; Sudan’s main highway is sealed for much of the way but most of the roads in the country are dirt or sand tracks. Crossing in to Sudan from Egypt via the ferry from Aswan to Wadi Halfa now has the benefit of the Chinese financed tarmac highway covering the 400km south to Dongola, and then right through to Khartoum, another 500km. [wikitravel]

By train – There is a weekly train from Wadi Halfa to Khartoum, which leaves some time after the weekly ferry from Aswan arrives. “Some time” can mean anything from a couple of hours to a couple of days but word usually spreads around town before the train leaves. There are a few different options for accommodation, and plenty of simple restaurants. The journey is scheduled for roughly 50 hours, but can vary greatly. [wikitravel]

Professional Groups & Events

Professional Groups & Events

Startup Grind Khartoum – Startup Grind is a global startup community designed to educate, inspire, and connect entrepreneurs. We host monthly events in 200 cities and 85 countries featuring successful local founders, innovators, & investors. [meetup]

Language Exchange

Language Exchange

Living in Sudan – Expats visiting Sudan will be welcomed by local hospitality, arid desert air and ancient pyramids. Sudan’s skyline is testament to both the country’s forward movement to the future and its rooted heritage. Foreigners have journeyed to Sudan to experience the culture of the Nile. Before you take to the desert sands of Sudan, take a look at some important information. [expat woman]

Your Expat Community in Sudan – Salam alaikum and welcome to InterNations Sudan! While the adventure of moving to Sudan can be thrilling, it can also be a nerve-wracking experience, and you’re sure to be plagued by questions such as, “what is the best way to find a job in Sudan?”, “should I move to Khartoum or Nyala?”, or “what can I expect from the healthcare system?”. [internations]

LGBT Groups

LGBT Groups

Freedom Sudan, the sudanese LGBT association – Freedom Sudan is an organization for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender in Sudan. [facebook]

Resources

Resources

Places in Sudan

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